We at Lieflingkind and a few other lovilees collaborated on a post to share a locally foraged DIY wreath tutorial. Last year kaRi shared a post on a floral & hessian wreath DIY that can be viewed here.

DIY wreath tutorial

In the spirit of Christmas my dear friend Lara from Bloom Floral Design decided to gather foraged cut flora from Wegraakbos Dairy Farm – one of our local farms which is situated in the misty mountains of Haenertsburg in Limpopo, South Africa.

Her intention was to only use indigenous pieces but she came across a brightly coloured Banksia which is native to Australia and decided she had to use at least one flower as it resembled a brightly lit candle stick. Most of the components of the wreath will hold out for approximately three weeks (perhaps more) with a few regular misting sessions.

Over at Lieflingkind we lovingly designed a rustic printable banner with two options – one that reads ‘Welcome’, and one which spells out ‘Happy Holidays’. This means that they don’t have to be used specifically during Christmas time & you can enjoy a beautiful wreath & printable all year round. Download them here.

DIY wreath tutorial
DIY wreath tutorial

Lara from Bloom Floral design put together the wreath design & lovely Elmarie from Prentjiemooi Photography did the photo’s – it’s always such a treat to work with these talented ladies!

DIY wreath tutorial

You will need

  • A basic woven wreath made from discarded sticks or invasive vines. If you reside in the Johannesburg area, there is a place opposite the Johannesburg Flower Market that sell many different woven products such as baskets and wreaths.
  • A collection of locally foraged flowers and greenery. We LOVE to look for silvery pieces of greenery that keep within the Christmas theme.
  • 1m of string (design of your choice)
  • 1 x Floral tape
  • 4 x Floral wire
  • Printable, printed on hard paper, cut & folded in half
  • Scissors for cutting the printable / string /creation of the wreath
  • Secateurs for foraging and creating the wreath
  • Glue for sticking the printable together onto the string

DIY wreath tutorial

Step 1
Collect your foraged flowers and greenery. We used goods from the local organic farm and dairy Wegraakbos.

Step 2
Lay all your green goods out upon the table, cut and clean up the stems. Showing only the best parts. Then decide which ones you will be using.

DIY wreath tutorial

Step 3
Find a base greenery to use on the one side and another on the opposite side. We used Tea Tree bush and the Banksia leaves. Start by filling your wreath up, using floral tape to fasten any wandering or loose pieces that need more structure to keep within the circular wreath.

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DIY wreath tutorial
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Step 4
Once you have created your green base, start adding smaller more interesting pieces. We used the following:

  • Safari Red cone bush
  • Ruby Pearl cone bush
  • Pink Erica

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Then find three focal points for your bigger pieces such as the yellow Banksia and Protea Rupens. Fasten them with the floral wire.

By now your wreath should be almost complete. Finish it up by adding fillers where necessary.

Step 5
Use your string and carefully place each banner flag in place and use glue to attach the paper to the string. Be sure to measure out even spaces between the flags.

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Step 6
Place your newly created festive bunting within the middle of the wreath and fasten on each side.

Step 7
Find a suitable place to hang your wreath. We would suggest your front door or on a feature wall in your living area.

Locally foraged wreath DIY
Locally foraged wreath DIY
Locally foraged wreath DIY

We’d love to hear what you think! Leave us with your comments below.

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Author

Colleen is the owner & creative behind Lieflingkind - a boutique design studio specializing in creative brand development & bespoke wedding stationery. Connect with her on social media on the links below.

Comments

  1. Baie oulik en prakties. Ook baie oorspronklik.